Category: Evaluation

Retake quizzes

This year, I did some experimenting with assessments. Usually, each unit includes two vocabulary quizzes, a grammar/morphology quiz, and a unit test. The test is certainly summative, but I view the vocabulary and grammar/morphology quizzes as both formative and summative in nature. I also think grades should reflect student's current knowledge of the material, so … Continue reading Retake quizzes

Where are my mistakes?

During spring break, I read a wonderful blog post from Education Week about formative assessments. It inspired me to try some new strategies that were definitely more effective, especially with my 7th graders. Usually, before spring break, we would use my adaptation of think-pair-share: students would practice forms in their notes, then each put a small number … Continue reading Where are my mistakes?

Sort these forms!

During spring break, I read a wonderful blog post from Education Week about formative assessments. It inspired me to try some new strategies that were definitely more effective, especially with my 7th graders. Usually, before spring break, we would use my adaptation of think-pair-share: students would practice forms in their notes, then each put a small number … Continue reading Sort these forms!

Continuing Reflection on Grading

As I've mentioned before, I really enjoy that our school offers us the opportunity to meet and discuss books about education. Even though I was not able to attend all the meetings this time, our book study for the Fall Semester was Thomas R. Guskey's 2015 book On Your Mark: Challenging the Conventions of Grading and … Continue reading Continuing Reflection on Grading

Weimer, Learner-Centered Teaching

I love that my school is making a push to have a more learner-centered learning experience for our students. As part of this, English and History classes frequently use the Harkness method and the year before I arrived at the school, a group of teachers did a book study of Dr. Maryellen Weimer's Learner-Centered Teaching: Five … Continue reading Weimer, Learner-Centered Teaching

Discouraging the use of Google Translate

Discouraging the use of Google Translate

"This is, like, your favorite game." One of my students said after I announced that we were going to play a game that I like to call "Are you smarter than Google Translate?" Pretty much every world language teacher dislikes our students using Google Translate, and each of us has our own way of discouraging … Continue reading Discouraging the use of Google Translate

Grading English Language Learners’ Writing

This semester, I'm teaching more international students than I have in the past. Since some of them do not always have the best English, it raises a question: how do I grade their writing? How much do I focus on their ideas and how much do I focus on their ability to communicate their ideas and … Continue reading Grading English Language Learners’ Writing

What is in a name?

A paper by any other name would be as formal, right? Apparently not. This semester, I assigned several brief writing assignments in my mythology and Roman archaeology classes. I called them "Exercises" so that they would not seems as stressful and help communicate that they should be brief. Instead, I think the word "Exercise" communicated that … Continue reading What is in a name?