Category: Lesson Plans

Lecture worksheets

This semester, as I walked around my classroom, I noticed that students' notes and notebooks were somewhat sparse and disorganized. In fact, they were mainly the paradigm charts.... often without explanation. This disturbed me, but I saw why their notes were this way. Students copied what I wrote on the board (or PowerPoint) or they … Continue reading Lecture worksheets

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Narrative, Cause/Effect, or Question of the Day: A tension in lesson planning

In a recent post, I shared some of the lessons that I learned while teaching world history this semester. I also gained insight into another tension that I've always confronted while teaching a history lesson: do I tell a story or do I answer a research question? Strayer's Ways of the World was enlightening because he … Continue reading Narrative, Cause/Effect, or Question of the Day: A tension in lesson planning

Ancient Slavery, a lesson plan

In a recent post, I commented on a difference between ancient slavery and the modern, American antebellum slavery: racism. Race was not a major factor in ancient slavery. But, how do we convince students of that? This semester, in Roman history, I spent an entire day on Roman slavery and the growth of slavery during the Late Republic, … Continue reading Ancient Slavery, a lesson plan

Geopedia, Pompeii, and Spatial Analysis

There is an excellent German website that combines Bing's maps with wikipedia's articles: http://www.geopedia.de/  Like videos, this is a great tool to take students on a virtual field trip.  For example, in my Roman Archaeology class, I asked students to visit this site at home, explore the excavated area of Pompeii, and answer a few … Continue reading Geopedia, Pompeii, and Spatial Analysis

Teaching the Homeric Question(s)

Homer is a foundational text for our discipline, and there has been a massive amount of scholarship about him and his poems.  Much of this work is detailed and complicated, and it draws on data points in many fields: Greek philology, archaeology, and Hittite studies. Many undergraduates do not possess the skills to grapple with this data--the … Continue reading Teaching the Homeric Question(s)

Talking about suicide: The Roman Civil Wars

Recently, I quickly taught about the Roman civil wars.  I mentioned Cato the Younger killing himself at Utica, Brutus and Cassius's suicides at Philippi, and Antony and Cleopatra's suicides after the Battle of Actium.  During my first class about the civil wars, I started to feel awkward talking about all these suicides, and I wondered … Continue reading Talking about suicide: The Roman Civil Wars