Category: Strategies for in the Classrrom

Ulrich Boser’s Learn Better

One of the great things at the Episcopal School of Jacksonville is that, each year, teachers can meet as a book club to discuss a book about education, learning, and teaching. This year, I was happy to be a part of the book study of Ulrich Boser's Learn Better about the process of learning and what … Continue reading Ulrich Boser’s Learn Better

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Introverts and ClassDojo

Before winter break, I read the book Quiet Power: The Secret Strengths of Introverted Kids. It was enlightening for me on a personal level and as a teacher. Susan Cain talks about the qualities of introverts and their tendencies as students and people in other social situations. They tend to: Be quiet but on task … Continue reading Introverts and ClassDojo

Lecture worksheets

This semester, as I walked around my classroom, I noticed that students' notes and notebooks were somewhat sparse and disorganized. In fact, they were mainly the paradigm charts.... often without explanation. This disturbed me, but I saw why their notes were this way. Students copied what I wrote on the board (or PowerPoint) or they … Continue reading Lecture worksheets

Rules for Discussion

While researching for my recent post about politics in the classroom, I came across this excellent quotation: "If children become accustomed to discussing their differences in a rational way in the primary years, they are more likely to accept it as normal in their adolescence. Citizenship education helps equip young people to deal with situations … Continue reading Rules for Discussion

From the Inbox

NPR: How TV Can Make Kids Better Readers New York Times on how to use marketing to convince children to eat vegetables Wired: How to apply game theory to parenting Mike Caulfield: "We have personalization [of learning] backwards" Catlin Tucker: "Invest in innovation [in teaching]" Catlin Tucker: Reasons to deliver content in the classroom as … Continue reading From the Inbox

Effectively Using Theoretical Models

At the beginning of the spring semester, I wrote that my courses will be more focused around themes and theoretical models. One of my friends responded on facebook: Love this! Can't wait to hear how your semester goes. I've also struggled with getting theory into my classes (particularly my archaeology classes). I have a bad … Continue reading Effectively Using Theoretical Models

Narrative, Cause/Effect, or Question of the Day: A tension in lesson planning

In a recent post, I shared some of the lessons that I learned while teaching world history this semester. I also gained insight into another tension that I've always confronted while teaching a history lesson: do I tell a story or do I answer a research question? Strayer's Ways of the World was enlightening because he … Continue reading Narrative, Cause/Effect, or Question of the Day: A tension in lesson planning

Politics in the Classroom

In the midst of some intense political happenings in Washington, DC, it seems appropriate to ask: how does a teacher responsibly and ethically handle, or remember regarding, politics in the classroom? Here is the fruit of my research: Recognize your own positions. We all develop beliefs in response to our perceptions, feelings, interpretations of the past, … Continue reading Politics in the Classroom