Category: writing

From the Inbox

NPR: How TV Can Make Kids Better Readers New York Times on how to use marketing to convince children to eat vegetables Wired: How to apply game theory to parenting Mike Caulfield: "We have personalization [of learning] backwards" Catlin Tucker: "Invest in innovation [in teaching]" Catlin Tucker: Reasons to deliver content in the classroom as … Continue reading From the Inbox

Grading English Language Learners’ Writing

This semester, I'm teaching more international students than I have in the past. Since some of them do not always have the best English, it raises a question: how do I grade their writing? How much do I focus on their ideas and how much do I focus on their ability to communicate their ideas and … Continue reading Grading English Language Learners’ Writing

What is in a name?

A paper by any other name would be as formal, right? Apparently not. This semester, I assigned several brief writing assignments in my mythology and Roman archaeology classes. I called them "Exercises" so that they would not seems as stressful and help communicate that they should be brief. Instead, I think the word "Exercise" communicated that … Continue reading What is in a name?

Object-based learning

There's something about handling an artifact or experiencing an ancient building during class that really unleashes a student's latent curiosity. In Cincinnati, I loved to use coin replicas from the University of Cincinnati Classics Department's study collection during class or in outreach presentations about ancient coins. Students were more engaged and asked a lot of questions … Continue reading Object-based learning

Students’ papers as arguments

So far this semester, I have graded students' brief writing assignments in two different classes. Both papers were grounded in describing an object.  One paper asked students to describe a building and then identify what type of building it was (i.e. Roman temple), and the other paper explicitly asked students to compare a vase painting to events described … Continue reading Students’ papers as arguments