Anachronism and site formation processes

Here's a cool blog post from res gerendae that discusses anachronism in a Lego model of Pompeii: https://resgerendae.wordpress.com/2016/10/13/lego-pompeii/

Advertisements

Politics in the Classroom

In the midst of some intense political happenings in Washington, DC, it seems appropriate to ask: how does a teacher responsibly and ethically handle, or remember regarding, politics in the classroom? Here is the fruit of my research: Recognize your own positions. We all develop beliefs in response to our perceptions, feelings, interpretations of the past, … Continue reading Politics in the Classroom

Ancient Slavery, a lesson plan

In a recent post, I commented on a difference between ancient slavery and the modern, American antebellum slavery: racism. Race was not a major factor in ancient slavery. But, how do we convince students of that? This semester, in Roman history, I spent an entire day on Roman slavery and the growth of slavery during the Late Republic, … Continue reading Ancient Slavery, a lesson plan

How teaching World History will change my classes on the ancient world

This semester, I have had the pleasure of team-teaching modern World History with a Middle Eastern historian. The experience emphasized for me that there are likely certain differences between the ancient world and the modern world, and I want to learn more about these issues. I also think these differences are often overlooked by our students in Latin … Continue reading How teaching World History will change my classes on the ancient world

The Importance of Teaching Late Antiquity

This year, I have taught several ancient history or archaeology courses that end in the eighth century CE instead of with the rise of Constantine or somewhere in the fourth century. Admittedly, my class periods on Late Antiquity cover a lot of time quickly, but I still think that it is important we include Late Antiquity … Continue reading The Importance of Teaching Late Antiquity

Stander Symposium

Today was a little different at the University of Dayton. Instead of regular classes, there was the Stander Symposium, a one-day conference-style day of classes where undergraduate and graduate students present their own research. Admittedly, yesterday, I didn't really know what to expect. Today, I saw posters sharing science research and I spent the afternoon … Continue reading Stander Symposium

NPR: Quiz on myths about learning

NPR put together a cool quiz to test whether your believe myths about how learning works and best teaching/learning practices. Go take it here! I got 6/7. I was tempted by the correct answer on the one I got wrong, and I am tempted to make it a greater part of my courses.