Tag: diversity

Ancient Slavery, a lesson plan

In a recent post, I commented on a difference between ancient slavery and the modern, American antebellum slavery: racism. Race was not a major factor in ancient slavery. But, how do we convince students of that? This semester, in Roman history, I spent an entire day on Roman slavery and the growth of slavery during the Late Republic, … Continue reading Ancient Slavery, a lesson plan

Grading English Language Learners’ Writing

This semester, I'm teaching more international students than I have in the past. Since some of them do not always have the best English, it raises a question: how do I grade their writing? How much do I focus on their ideas and how much do I focus on their ability to communicate their ideas and … Continue reading Grading English Language Learners’ Writing

Towards ethical social justice education

Last Tuesday's election and its aftermath encouraged me to look into something that I had been considering for a while now: how do I ethically encourage students to act in a more socially just way? There is a fair amount of literature on social justice education, and I present here my findings from an initial bit … Continue reading Towards ethical social justice education

Stereotype threat

"Stereotype threat is being at risk of confirming, as self-characteristic, a negative stereotype about one's group," according to Steele and Aronson 1995 who first defined this phenomenon. This sad phenomenon causes people to think along these lines, for example: "I am a girl. Girls are stereotypically bad at math, so I am bad at math." … Continue reading Stereotype threat

T. H. M. Gellar-Goad’s “How Learning Works in the Greek and Latin Classroom” Blog Posts

In June 2014, T. H. N. Gellar-Goad began a seven part series of blog posts for the Society of Classical Studies. These posts took the insights from How Learning Works by Susan Ambrose et al. and discussed how to apply these ideas to teaching Latin and Greek. The last post of the series was in July … Continue reading T. H. M. Gellar-Goad’s “How Learning Works in the Greek and Latin Classroom” Blog Posts