Tag: feedback

From the Inbox

NPR: How TV Can Make Kids Better Readers New York Times on how to use marketing to convince children to eat vegetables Wired: How to apply game theory to parenting Mike Caulfield: "We have personalization [of learning] backwards" Catlin Tucker: "Invest in innovation [in teaching]" Catlin Tucker: Reasons to deliver content in the classroom as … Continue reading From the Inbox

Grading English Language Learners’ Writing

This semester, I'm teaching more international students than I have in the past. Since some of them do not always have the best English, it raises a question: how do I grade their writing? How much do I focus on their ideas and how much do I focus on their ability to communicate their ideas and … Continue reading Grading English Language Learners’ Writing

What is in a name?

A paper by any other name would be as formal, right? Apparently not. This semester, I assigned several brief writing assignments in my mythology and Roman archaeology classes. I called them "Exercises" so that they would not seems as stressful and help communicate that they should be brief. Instead, I think the word "Exercise" communicated that … Continue reading What is in a name?

Students’ papers as arguments

So far this semester, I have graded students' brief writing assignments in two different classes. Both papers were grounded in describing an object.  One paper asked students to describe a building and then identify what type of building it was (i.e. Roman temple), and the other paper explicitly asked students to compare a vase painting to events described … Continue reading Students’ papers as arguments

How do we make students happier?

I keep coming back to this theme, partly because of my desire to help students' emotional health, partly because students' feelings about classes affect what they learn from those classes or how they apply their knowledge to their life, partly because students' emotions affect the classroom environment, and partly because students' emotions affect enrollment and … Continue reading How do we make students happier?

Rubrics

In continuation of my series of posts about helping students develop better emotional health and providing students with useful feedback (see standards-based grading, SE2R feedback, and commenting on students' writing), I wanted to explore rubrics.  Even though they may not seem like the most exciting topic, they are not completely straightforward either.  I list here … Continue reading Rubrics

Providing feedback on students’ writing

The best kind of commentary enhances the writer's feeling of dignity. The worst kind can be experienced as dehumanizing and insulting--often to the bewilderment of the teacher, whose intentions were kindly but whose techniques ignored the personal dimension of writing. (Engaging Ideas, p. 317) With this comment, John Bean explains the importance of providing strong, … Continue reading Providing feedback on students’ writing

Stereotype threat

"Stereotype threat is being at risk of confirming, as self-characteristic, a negative stereotype about one's group," according to Steele and Aronson 1995 who first defined this phenomenon. This sad phenomenon causes people to think along these lines, for example: "I am a girl. Girls are stereotypically bad at math, so I am bad at math." … Continue reading Stereotype threat

T. H. M. Gellar-Goad’s “How Learning Works in the Greek and Latin Classroom” Blog Posts

In June 2014, T. H. N. Gellar-Goad began a seven part series of blog posts for the Society of Classical Studies. These posts took the insights from How Learning Works by Susan Ambrose et al. and discussed how to apply these ideas to teaching Latin and Greek. The last post of the series was in July … Continue reading T. H. M. Gellar-Goad’s “How Learning Works in the Greek and Latin Classroom” Blog Posts